Wednesday, April 23, 2008

HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY

~

Heart is so big to keep us close and dear
Advices are always wise and best for us
Presence is a remedy when child is ill
Patiently and silently weeps when in pain
Youth once and now is a good mother

Many sleepless nights from birthing on
Our triumphs make her feel great and proud
Teaching children to be kind and polite
Holds children gently in time of sorrows
Endless love for all her children is marvelous
Religiously raising us to have a bright future
Sacrifices she endures are truly incredible

Devotion to the family is everlasting
Admirable model for her growing children
Your love is the foundation of an ideal family

Laura B. Corpuz
March 18, 2006

Friday, April 11, 2008

Bamboo: An Economic Source for Filipinos

By: Laura B. Corpuz, laurabc@bumail.bradley.edu

When you hear the word "bamboo" you think thin, tall, and pliable. Filipinos may be thin but not all tall, but have you heard of Filipinos being called “bamboo people?” It’s not surprising. We should be proud of it because Filipinos are very resourceful; we utilize every part of this plant, the “bamboo,” from its shoots to dust.


They eat bamboo shoots.
They use bamboo as anchors.
They use bamboo for railings.
They make bamboo savings bank.
They build fences using bamboo.
They make bamboo barbecue sticks.
They use scrap bamboo as firewood.
They use split bamboo to make fans.
They strip bamboo for nipa roofing.
They live in houses made of bamboo.
They make bamboo baskets and trays.
They use bamboo as house ornaments.
They use bamboo pole as fishing rods.
They use bamboo for the corner posts.
They build farm bridges using bamboo.
They use bamboo to construct bridges.
They use half split bamboo as gutters.
They have bamboo groves in their lands.
They make woven bamboo as shrimp traps.
They use bamboo for various craft works.
They made a "Bamboo Organ" in Las Piñas.
They weave split bamboo for house walling.
They split and weave bamboo to pick cashews.
They use bamboo as fireworks on New Year's Eve.
They make bamboo musical instrument like "Pito."
They use bamboo in dancing "Tinikling,” a Filipino dance.
They use bamboo "tikin" to propel boats in the lakes and rivers.
They still use whole bamboo with an open end as downpipe for running water.
At the end of a bamboo pole (tikin) was attached a cloth soaked in vile and vinegar to quench Jesus' thirst as He suffered on the cross to redeem us, sinners.
Take pride in being creative and resourceful that boost the economy in the Philippines.

1993 All Rights Reserved

Thursday, April 10, 2008

MOTHER

~
M” is for the millions of things she did for all her children
“O” is for her open-mindedness in understanding her family
“T” is for teaching us what “needs” and “wants” truly mean
“H” is for the good heart, love, and compassion she had for us
“E” is for exceptional discipline and guidance we received from her
“R” is for the respect for what we had to say when we were young

These letters that formed the word MOTHER
mean so much to me. I only wished that she had
lived a little longer to see all her grandchildren.

By: Laura B. Corpuz
May 14, 2006

Wednesday, April 9, 2008

Holy Week Pabasa

The religious practices of the Filipinos were greatly influenced by the Spaniards who ruled the Philippine Islands for over 300 years. One of those is the Lenten practice of the Filipinos. The Holy Week celebration starts on Palm Sunday. Palm Sunday commemorates the end of Jesus' private life and the beginning of His public life and entrance to the Holy city of Jerusalem. People bring palm leaves to church to be blessed by the priest. Some palm leaves are intertwined, braided, and beautifully decorated and are preserved in homes, as well as in private altars of the Filipino people. They venerate the palm leaves for salvation, believing that they will be delivered from evil. Palm leaves symbolize the triumph of Jesus over death, death He suffered on the cross to save us, sinners. Palm Sunday celebrates Jesus' passion and death prior to his crucifixion on Golgotha, to rise again on Easter Sunday.

"Pabasa" is traditionally held in barrio chapels. The public "Pabasa” is a tradition among Filipinos; an invitation is extended to the local people, including those from the neighboring barrios. It usually starts immediately after the first Palm Sunday mass. The book of the passion of Christ is chanted in many different ways, melodies, sung or chanted in harmony. Readers (men women, even children continue reading/chanting the book of passion of Christ from start to finish). The book is written in 5-line verses and although it depicts the life of Jesus, birth, death and resurrection, the book starts with a prayer to Almighty God and to the Virgin Mother, followed by the creation of the world. The host of the public "Pabasa" sets up the altar and provides two books for the readers. One group of readers reads or chants one verse and the other group of readers reads or chants the next verse. This is a community effort of the townsfolk, because the passion readers come not only from their own barrio but also from different places or towns. The people set up a "pagoda" or a temporary tent, shelter or "kubol," where they serve the readers food. They, not only prepare snacks and drinks, but they also cook native dishes for the readers and other guests coming to participate in the readings. Readers have scheduled reading times throughout the day and night. At times, the host holds a contest and gives prizes to the best readers.

Other barrios hold their "Pabasa" on another day, so that the town’s people can participate in this glorious event. On Holy Thursday and Good Friday, there are flagellants (mandurugo), making their own sacrifices like that of Jesus' for the forgiveness of their sins. Men are usually the ones doing this form of sacrifice although there are some women who also get crucified to the cross. Men get their backs cut, (bloody), their eyes are blindfolded, crowned with branches and leaves, usually guava leaves, enduring the heat of the sun, and walking on their bare feet many miles. When they get closer to where the "pabasa" is taking place, or even in front of a house where someone is reading the passion of Christ, they stop facing the chapel or the house, kneel down, make the sign of the cross and lay on their stomachs to be whipped on their buttocks and feet by their companions. This is a practice that, even if the church leaders do not agree to, is tolerated, to respect the belief of the Filipinos about personal sacrifices and salvation. However, this form of self-sacrifice does not replace the sacrament of penance. Some carry a cross wearing a garment like that of Jesus' and would do the same thing the "mandurugo" do. At this time, the other people would hold the cross in order for the man carrying the cross to be able to kneel down and be on his stomach to be whipped. "Pabasa" usually ends on or before Good Friday and is followed by "Siete Palabras," the Seven LastWords of Jesus before he died on the cross. The recitation of the seven last words is nationallybroadcast. The entire Philippine Islands is in mourning; it's the most solemn, saddest, and quiet time of the year. In the late afternoon, the dead body of Jesus is processed on the street while the people follow the procession to bury the dead body of Jesus.

Some families hold private "pabasa" in their homes inviting only a few relatives and friends. They don't necessarily have to finish the passion of Christ book at one sitting; they allow breaks and the host family finishes reading the book, even if takes more days to finish reading it. The Way of the Cross is also reenacted by constructing fourteen Stations of the Cross in front of 14 houses throughout the town or barrio. There is a procession on the street led by a priest, while people continue to chant the Passion of Christ. As the procession goes, people go to the stations in numerical order and contemplate on that particular station of the cross. While some religious go with the Stations of the Cross on the street, others attend the Stations of the Cross held in the church or chapel.

"Sinakulo" is a stage reenactment of the Life of Jesus. This is held in some barrios and the actorsand actresses are the town's people. Participants chant the verses as in the Passion of Christ book. Early in the morning, before dawn of Easter Sunday, a double procession starts on either end of townor barrio. One procession has the Risen Christ and the other has the sorrowing Virgin Mother and Mary Magdalene carrying a bottle of perfume followed by marching bands. The processions meet in front of the chapel or church. At this time, an angel, suspended from a roof top or tree top removes the black veil covering the face of the Virgin Mary, while the other angels sing "Alleluia." The congregation then proceeds to the church for the Easter Sunday mass. This takes a lot of preparation, timing, and coordination because the two processions must be in front of the church at a specific time. (This procession only takes place once, just before the first mass on Easter Sunday.) In other parts of the country, the procession of the Risen Christ is accompanied by young boys and men while the procession of the sorrowing Virgin Mother and Mary Magdalene is accompanied by young girls and women of that town or barrio. This is a practice in Isabela, Philippines.

After the procession, an effigy of Judas, hanging on a tree, is burned. Children enjoy this activitywith great excitement because of the coins that fall down from the effigy. The coins symbolize the 30 pieces of silver Judas received from the Jews in his betrayal of Jesus.

Note:

1. As a rule, the public "pabasa" is done continuously. The readers continue to read the book nonstop. Anyone can read the book of Passion of Christ at home anytime. This is, infact, recommended by older people because of the many passages in it that have so much effects on our daily lives. To them, the book is a bible.

2. In various parts of the book of passion are the following letters
"A R A L" - and may also be chanted as

A-R-A-L

Ang unang letra'y Anunsasyon
Ikalawa'y Resureksyon
Ikatlo ay Adorasyon
Ang ika'pat ay Lamintasyon
Aral
ng Mahal na Poon.

or

A-R-A-L

Ang unang letra ay "A"
" Ere naman ang pangalawa
Ang pangatlong letra ay “A”
"Ele," pang-apat na letra
ARAL sa taong lahat na.

By: Laura B. Corpuz (laurabc@bumail.bradley.edu)

SUNGKA: An Ancient Filipino Game


Our Impong Huli (Huliana Arcega Garcia) who was born in the mid 1870's taught us how to play this game. She was the only expert I have ever known in playing Sungka.

SUNGKA: A board game of 7 equal sized holes called "bahay" and 2 bigger holes on either end of the board. Needs 98 small tamarind seeds or sea shells.

A "manu-mano" may be a choice but not necessary. "Sungka" gets to be more exciting when a player continues to play until the game is over without dying. It's like monopolizing the game. Only experts can do this kind of monopoly, like our great, great, grandparents and only if it happens in the "manu-mano" when the expert player gets to play first.

Two players sit on either side of the board across from each other. Each player fills their small houses with 7 seeds/counters each, leaving the big houses empty. The big house to the left of the player is his designated house. The goal is to store as many seeds as possible in their designated big houses. This is called "subi" literally meaning "to store." Players start playing simultaneously, going clockwise, by picking up all the seeds from one small house and dropping one seed in each house he/she passes by including his big house, but NEVER dropping a seed in the other player's big house. Wherever the last seed is dropped, the player picks up all the seeds from that house and continues to distribute them in each of the small houses. If the player drops the final seed in his big house, he may again, pick up seeds from one of his own houses and continue to drop them in all the small houses. If a player drops the last seed in an empty house of the other player, he loses his turn, and is declared "patay." If he drops the last seed in his own empty small house, he is also declared "patay." However, if there are seeds in the small house across from his empty house where he dies out, he can knock on the seeds, take them and store them in his big house. It's called "katok." That leaves 2 small houses empty, one of his houses and the one across from that empty house.

The other player continues to play until he dies out. "Sungka" player expert usually starts from the small house containing enough seeds to end up dropping the last seed in his big house. The game is over when one player runs out of seeds on his side of the board.

Both players then start filling in their small houses again, as it was in the beginning (7 seeds or counters in each small house). Begin filling the small houses from the players big house (left to right) counterclockwise. The winner of the game stores the seeds in his big "bahay" leaving the other player with less number of small houses filled. The number of empty small house(s) a player has is called "sunog.” Any remaining counters that did not total 7 are stored in that player's big "bahay."
The game starts again, and the winner of the previous game starts. This player must not drop any seeds in the opponent's burnt house(s).
The game continues until the players decide to quit and declare a winner or they wait till the loser gets more burnt houses.
*
How to Win the Game

1. The goal of Sungka is to acquire as much seeds/counters and store them in the players’ big houses.

2. Remember to always drop a seed into the player’s big house during each round.

3. Think of dropping the last seed into the player’s big house (subi) whenever there’s a chance.

4. The only seed closest to the player’s big house goes automatically to the big house. Pick up this only seed and store it in the big house (subi). Player may pick up some seeds from his side of the board and start distributing them again.

5. Think of dropping the last seed opposite the other player’s small house that has a lot of seeds. The player can knock at this small house full of seeds, take them and store them in his big house. That’s a lot of seeds taken at once. It’s a jackpot!

6. Opponent targets the small house that has a lot of seeds, so make sure to distribute them to avoid the small house getting knocked (katok) by the opponent.

7. When the other player loses the first round of Sungka he’ll have at least one burned house (sunog). Players will not drop any seed into this small burned house(s), therefore the small
house(s) on the player’s side will not be in danger of getting knocked by the opponent.

8. As a round is about to end, keep seeds away from the big house. A lot of knockings will take place now until the opponent runs out of seeds to move or store into his big house. Once a player runs out of seeds the game is over. So if the player has more seeds to move from the farthest right, the more chances the player has to get to the big house that keeps him on the game.

Note: If the winner of the first round runs out of seeds to distribute, the loser of the first round with burned house(s) has a chance to start the next round of game even if he does not have enough seeds to fill the small houses.

Have fun!

Terms:
bahay - house
katok - knock, rap, tap
manu-mano - hand-to-hand, (determine who plays first)
patay - dead
subi - keep, store
sunog - burn
Note: This game was used as a reference during the First Sungka Tournament in Vienna, Austria November 30, 2008.

Tuesday, April 8, 2008

Rhymes and Songs Taught by My Family

By: Laura Balatbat-Corpuz
laurabc@bumail.bradley.edu 3-18-1997



Rhymes, like riddles, add flavor to the Filipino culture. Some words may not mean anything but they are used to give poetic sounds. I personally believe in the antiquity of these rhymes due to the fact that these were hardly heard of and some are not even taught in schools. My family (Balatbat-Garcia) passed these on to us. I remember my mother, grandparents, great aunts and uncles entertained us at night. In the evening, especially when the moon was bright, instead of playing "Patintero," we would sit on the front porch of our grandparents' house reciting these rhymes. Our close relationship with them inspired all of us, (my sisters and cousins) to memorize them. I know all these by heart and would like to share them with you. Hopefully, you find them interesting and entertaining. There may be some other grandparents who know or have something to say about these rhymes. These rhymes truly amuse me because of the meanings behind them.

"Ang dalagang tumatanda, parang bigas na pinawa
Isabog mo man sa lupa, manok man ay ayaw tumuka."
~
"Ang dalaga kapag maganda, batiin mo'y nakatawa."

~ "Ang dalaga kapag pangit, batiin mo'y nagagalit."

~ "Ang dalaga kapag maganda parang hinog na papaya
Ikubli mo man sa sanga uukitin din ng maya."
~
"Ang dalaga kapag pangit, parang bayabas na ukit
Iladlad mo man sa langit, ibon ma'y ayaw umukit."
~
"Ang bungang hinog sa sanga, matamis ang lasa."
~
"Ang bungang hinog sa pilit, kung kainin ay mapait."
~
"Ang pag-aasawa ay hindi biro
‘Di tulad ng kanin, iluluwa kung mapaso."

~
The following (Luya, Gugo) may be sung to the tune of Leron, Leron Sinta)
~
1. Luya (Ginger)

Ako ay nagtanin ng kapirasong luya
Tumubo ay gabi, namunga ng mangga
Nang pipitasin ko'y, hinog na papaya
Bumagsak sa lupa'y, magandang dalaga.
~
2. Gugo – (Local Shampoo)

Ito palang gugo, ang bunga'y bayugo
Ibong si "tiklores" balahibo'y pito
May pang araw-araw, may pang Linggu-Linggo
Bukod ang pamista, iba ang pamasko.
~
3. Buwan (Moon)

"Buwan, buwan, sisilang; hulugan mo ako ng sundang."
"Aanhin mo ang sundang?"
"Ikakayas ko ng uway."
"Aanhin mo ang uway?"
"Itatali ko sa bahay."
"Aanhin mo ang bahay?"
"Sisidlan ko ng palay."
"Aanhin mo ang palay?"
"Kakanin ko habang buhay."

~
~ Other rhymes used by my family while playing with little children ~

These are fun games to play.
~
1. Usually played by holding baby/infants’ arms and legs together with one hand. The other hand gives a pounding motion while reciting the following rhyme. The baby/infant's legs and arms are released at the same time the word "babae/lalake" is mentioned depending on the baby/infants'gender.
~
"Pong, pong, kasili
Nanganak kagabi

Sa punong haligi
Ano anak? Ano anak?"
(Babae/Lalake
/child's name)
~
2. Another fun game to play. The child sits on the extended legs of an adult while reciting this.

Biyabo

"Biyabo, biyabo, sulutin mo si Piro
Kung may huling kuwago
Wala po kung hindi tatlo."
"Saan tayo maglalapa
Sa bahay po ni Kastila."
"Kung tayo po ay magiba
Tukuran nang mababa."
"Kung tayo po ay magiri
Tukuran ng daliri."
~
This rhyme sounds like a play itself or a pre-play.

Pen, Pen de Serapen

Pen, Pen de Serapen
De kutsilyo de almasen
Haw, haw de karabao batutin
Sayang pula tatlong pera
Sayang puti tatlong salapi
Sipit namimilipit, ginto't pilak
Namumulaklak sa tabi ng dagat.

~
Religous Rhymes: All Saints' Day

1. Kaluluwa

Kaluluwa kaming tambing
Sa purgatoryo nanggaling
Kung kami po'y lilimusan
Dali-dalian po lamang
Baka kami'y mapagsarhan
Ng pinto sa kalangitan
.
~
2. Kalambibit (Used During Wake)
~
Dalit-dalit kalambibit
Lulutang-lutang sa tubig
* Kapag ito'y iyong nasagip
* Talian mo ng lubid.

* I made up these lines to complete the rhyme.

Damong Makahiya

(Taught by Lucila Garcia-Perona and Benita Marquez-Garcia (deceased) to their nieces)

Sa paligid nitong landas patungo ng kabukiran
May tumubong isang damo Makahiya, damong parang
Ang dahon ay maliliit, maliliit na halaman
Na sa lupa’y nakahimlay, sumusupling gumagapang.

Itong damong Makahiya ‘di paris ng ibang puno
Pagkat ito’y parang tao, may damdamin at may puso
Ang dahon ay nakabuka, sa hangin ay sumusuyo

Dahan-dahang tumitikom, pag may kamay na humipo.

Copyright @ 1997 All Rights Reserved

Thursday, April 3, 2008

Words of Wisdom: A Collection From Various Unknown Sources

~
laurabc@bradley.edu
~
This note must accompany this material to avoid plagiarism.
~
"If it is to be, it is up to me."
~
"Children are poor men's riches."
~
"Seek the best on everyone you meet."
~
"Take the brightest view in any discussion."
~
"Be careful in decision making."
~
"Strive to realize your dreams."
~
"March to the beat of your heart's desire."
~
"Cheer things up, no troubles tell."
~
"She loves me, she loves me not, she loves me, and we tied the knot."
~
"Failure is not falling down; failure is not getting up."
~
"If you don't make mistakes, you don't make anything."
~
"Today is the beginning of the rest of your life."
~
"You pass this way but once, any good you can do, do it now."
~
"If you don't think well of yourself, no one will think anything of you."
~
"Treat your children like plants, with lots of sunshine and room to grow."
~
"While there's life, there's hope."
~
"It is hope alone that makes us willing to live."
~
"A good hope is better than a bad possession."
~
"He that can have patience can have what he will."
~
"Common sense is genius dressed in its working clothes."
~
"We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit."
~
"Recall pleasant memories."
~
"A smile and a thank you won't cost you a dime. But not doing either may cost you later."
~
"Don't think about the cost of doing something; think about the cost for doing nothing."
~
"Everything is of use to a housekeeper."
~
"It is poor heart that never rejoices."
~
"The heart should have no witness but itself."
~
"A good hope is better than a bad possession."
~
"Hope and patience are two sovereign remedies for all."
~
"Behind the dark cloud is a silver lining."
~
"If hoping does you good, hope on."
~
"Whosoever humbles himself shall be exalted."
~
"Humility is the foundation of all virtues."
~
"Life is short and the art is long."
~
"A cheerful look makes a dish a feast."
~
"God hath often a great share in a little house."
~
"A small house well filled is better than a empty palace."
~
"Every one can keep house better than the mother, till she tryeth."
~
"The husband sings and the wife accompanies."
~
"A thing of beauty is a joy forever."
~
"Happiness is a choice."
~
"Associate with positive people."
~
"If you don't make mistakes, you don't do anything."
~
"In all wedding cakes, hope is the sweetest of the plums."
~
"A deaf man and a blind wife are always a happy couple."
~
"Every man should believe there's but one good wife in the world, and that's his own."
~
"It's better to be faithful than famous."
~
"Let not your heart be troubled."
~
"Hearts may agree though the heads differ."
~
"Humility is beauty with pride and integrity."
~
"If they only married when they fell in love, most people would die unwed."
~
"All true love is grounded on esteem."
~
"The only thing that can hollow marriage is love, and the only genuine marriage is that which is hallowed by love."
~
"Love is love's reward."
~
"Love is often the fruit of marriage."
~
"Wedded love is founded on esteem."
~
"One year of love, another of comfort, and all the rest of content."
~
"The sacred academy of man's life is holy wedlock in a happy life."
~
"Common sense is genius dressed in working clothes."
~
"He who thinks he is always right needs a second opinion."
~
"I make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes."
~
"We are shaped and fashioned by what we love."
~
"The mere sense of living is joy enough."
~
"If you don't learn from your mistakes, there's no sense making them."
~
"I am not afraid of storms for I am learning to sail my ship."
~
"You pass this way but once, any good you can do, do it now."
~
"If you don't think well of yourself, no one will think anything of you."
~
"Treat your children like plants, with lots of sunshine and room to grow."
~
"While there's life, there's hope."
~
"It is hope alone that makes us willing to live."
~
"A good hope is better than a bad possession."
~
“Happiness is a choice.”

From Laura's Collections

Wednesday, April 2, 2008

Ornamental Kitchen Essentials ~ By: Laura B. Corpuz

~
laurabc@bumail.bradley.edu
~
"Simplicity is beauty." There is beauty in simple things that many of us overlook; we are too busy of thinking other things to make any thing look pretty. But, we are blessed with so many materials around us that all we have to do is put them into something useful. Life is full of challenges and home decorating is one of them that many homemakers face. Some have very simple taste; some want their homes to be plain looking and some want their homes look fancy. All these depend on the fashion, styles, and mood of the homeowners. One thing they have in common is to make their homes look attractive, delightful, charming, and appealing, because it is the home that is the happiest place of all.
~
My grade and high school years in the 1950's opened my eyes to many craft works including bag and basket making. I learned not only to weave baskets but also how to prepare a home garden. Summer gardening here in the USA and the bountiful harvest make our homemaking and decorating so much fun. Making a basket was a challenge my friend and I took afterfinishing other projects in Home Economics class. We were very fortunate to be able to afford to buy necessary materials to make a basket for weaving. I vividly remembered our teacher cutting a piece of plywood with a saw for the base and shaving rattan and fine strips of bamboo. Whenthis wastebasket was finished I placed it in our kitchen for trash use only. Macramé was the other craftwork I learned in grade school. There is beauty in our Philippine baskets and other bamboo and rattan products.
~ In high school, I white painted a hard broom, decorated it with Christmas ornaments and displayed it the entire yuletide season. Those Filipino essentials are everywhere and whenever I see them, those grade and high school years always bring back fun memories of crafts work.Baskets, brooms and garden produce are just not for the kitchen anymore. Also, decorating with them does not leave holes on the walls. They are movable and each time they are relocated, they give a new look to what we call "home sweet home."
~
* Woven baskets of different shapes and sizes would give a country look on cupboard tops. They may also be utilized as kitchen or house containers like napkin holders and other kitchen utensils/gadgets. They can be just be simply utility baskets.
~
* Bamboo/Rattan-made baskets make flower arrangements more attractive if used as a base or holders.
~
* Midribs of Palm Leaves (Tingting) give a more gracious look when added to a floral arrangement especially the curly ones. A bundle of these longer "tingting" gives a tropical look in corner of the living or family room. This also looks so cool behind a sofa or love seat.
~
* Hard Broom (Walis na Tingting) when painted white and colorfully decorated would be a lovely X'mas tree. It should be set upside down. A natural look "tingting" with fine silk flowers glued to the broom is very attractive too. A hot pot holder may be used as a base or standalone if tightly bundled.
~
* Hot pot holder (Dikin) and wood carved pot look so elegant on a glass-topped table. Its reflection on the glass top is an added beauty to a living room.
~
* Braided garlic adds an accent to a kitchen decor aside from keeping bad spirits away, as Filipinos believe. Both ends of longer or bigger braids may be tied together for wreath-like look. A ribbon may also be tied to it for added beauty.
~
* Soft Broom (Tambo) looks beautiful when hung by a fireplace. It may also be adorned with seasonal ribbons. Soft brooms bring home-style warmth to any family room.
~
* Corn Stalks beautify lawns and gardens especially in the fall season. They may be placed on the porch or tied to the yard light.
~
* Bundles of corn from the garden hung in the kitchen are a lovely decoration. Place them by a garden bench and watch some birds peck on them.
~
* Garden harvests gathered in a big basket or bushels give a bountiful look as a front porch fall display.
~
1995 All Rights Reserved
Laura B. Corpuz- laurabc@bumail.bradley.edu

Tuesday, April 1, 2008

Reyna ng Langit (Regina Caeli)

By: E.P. Hontiveros, SJ
~
Reyna ng langit, magalak ka! Aleluya! Aleluya!
Reyna ng langit, magalak ka! Aleluya! Aleluya!
~
1. Sapagkat si Hesukristo ang Anak mo, Aleluya!
Sapagkat si Hesukristo ang Anak mo, Aleluya!
Isinilang mo si Kristo, Aleluya! Aleluya!
Siya ang ating Mananakop, Aleluya! Aleluya!
~
Ipanalangin kaming makasalanan,
Ipanalangin mo, Aleluya! Aleluya! Aleluya!
~
2. Sapagkat si Hesukristo ang Anak mo, Aleluya!
Sapagkat si Hesukristo ang Anak mo, Aleluya!
Magmuli Siyang nabuhay. Aleluya! Aleluya!
Magmuli Siyang nabuhay. Aleluya! Aleluya!
~
Ipanalangin kaming makasalanan,
Ipanalangin mo, Aleluya! Aleluya! Aleluya!
~
3. Sapagkat inakyat ka sa kalangitan, Aleluya!
Sapagkat inakyat ka sa kalangitan, Aleluya!
Nasa piling ka ni Kristo, Aleluya! Aleluya!
Reyna ng langit at lupa, Aleluya! Aleluya!
~
Ipanalangin kaming makasalanan,
Ipanalangin mo, Aleluya! Aleluya! Aleluya

Mula sa: Tayo'y Umawit at Sumamba